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Macca
06-06-2009, 02:35 AM
Still being a relative new comer to the sports tourers (ST 1300 ) Im still trying to find the correct riding posture to suit my poor old 62 year old body. Im finding that if I dont tuck my kness tight against the fuel tank but leave them out a little and only have the heels on the pegs with the toes pointing down towards the road I get a fairly comfortable ride. However is this the correct posture to ride the 1300 , or am I learning bad habbits. Whats the consensus of opinions , knees tucked into the tank , or a little out , foot at right angle to the peg , or facing down.

Long Tom
06-06-2009, 04:28 AM
I keep my legs fairly relaxed while riding, I don't make any special effort to keep them against the tank except when going through a nice twisty section of road.

I've always ridden with the balls of my feet on the footpeg, so that I can shift my weight easily if necessary. Its only a slight movement to reach the shifter or rear brake. I never, ever let my toes point down.... lean too far with your toes down and you'll be trimming your toenails by grinding them on the asphalt.

the Ferret
06-06-2009, 06:59 AM
I grip the tank with my knees which seems to help with using the stomach muscles to hold my body up which iin turn allows me to relax my arms and shoulders. Not sure what I do with my feet ha ha

tercol58
06-06-2009, 07:14 AM
+ 1 on nt pointing toes down I used to do that after I grazed the asphalt once I* decided on different foot position. That is a bit scary when it happens could cause you to over react did me anyway.

peegee5344
06-06-2009, 07:17 AM
I like my heels on the passenger peg support and toes on the front pegs. :D

Papa
06-06-2009, 07:35 AM
You should see BES ride standing on the saddle.

PolarBear64
06-06-2009, 09:43 AM
I keep my legs fairly relaxed while riding, I don't make any special effort to keep them against the tank except when going through a nice twisty section of road.

I've always ridden with the balls of my feet on the footpeg, so that I can shift my weight easily if necessary. Its only a slight movement to reach the shifter or rear brake. I never, ever let my toes point down.... lean too far with your toes down and you'll be trimming your toenails by grinding them on the asphalt.

+1 on using the balls of you feet on the peg. But to "stretch out" I'll put the middleof my foot for a bit. But the best control is when you put the balls of you feet on the pegs. As for the knees, they usually are "hugging" the tank or about 1/2" from it, unless in the twistees where I will move up on the tank a bit more.

JohnConner
06-06-2009, 10:06 AM
My big thing is arm position. I lean forward a little so my elbows are bent and my arms are flexable on the handlebars. This lets the bike 'have it's head' kinda like riding a horse.

Gripping the bars tightly and having the arms straight causes fatigue and problems controling the bike. All the bumps of the road get translated straight into your shoulders and head, and you tend to fight the bike more, which can lead to other handling problems.

I haven't quite figured out how to relax my legs yet. Recently did a 250 mile ride over 6 hours and ended up with cramped legs that evening. I normally ride with the pegs in front of my heels but not on the balls, with the toes pointed down. I have dragged my left toe on the asphalt a few times when in the twisties, but not my right. Seems the right toe naturally rides higher.

Been thinking about a set of highway blades from MCL that mount on the engine roll-over bars. Anyone riding with these? How do you like them?

JohnConner
:biker:

Phartz
06-06-2009, 10:17 AM
Most of the time the balls of my feet are on the pegs with my legs against the tank. Not really applying any pressure, just resting there. On a long, straight slab ride I will, at times, put the middle or heel of my foot on the pegs and spread my legs more or less for different positions, relaxation, and air flow. One of my knees does start to complain if I keep the balls on the pegs for hours on end.

Ditto on the keeping the upper body relaxed. It does indeed reduce fatigue and make for a better handling bike. Just tightening up the arms/shoulders slightly can induce a wobble-like effect if in dirty air or rough pavement.

Barnyard
06-06-2009, 10:28 AM
Now those are some BIG FEET :"O
I like my heels on the passenger peg support and toes on the front pegs. :D

martinc
06-06-2009, 03:10 PM
First, take a minute a read this link to the best riding info ever, widely known as "Master Yoda's Riding Position"

http://midliferider.com/blog/2008/02/17/learn-how-to-sit-on-your-bike-meet-master-yoda/

It is useful to remember that when this piece references 'the hips' it is referring to that place in the lower pelvis where the long bones of the upper leg fit into the pelvis. This the location of the ball and socket arrangement, one on each side of the body.

The good news is that this riding position is close to how the human body is designed to sit. A a slight concave curvature to the lower back with the legs and feet under the body. This allows us to absorb impacts (e.g. potholes) with the large muscles of the thighs. This alone got me off a VTX1800 cruiser style motorcycle. A typical cruiser seating position (feet forward) will drive such impacts right up the spine.

All in all, the sport touring or standard riding position is the best by far, lucky for us older dudes who plan to keep on rolling.

Ride on amigo...

ChrisK
06-06-2009, 03:55 PM
+1 on the Master Yoda Riding Position



"The keynotes to "the" Riding Position are:

Bend at the HIPS, not waist

Maintain a SLIGHT arch to the back, not allowing it ever to "curve"

Move the butt AFT so the weight is OVER YOUR FEET.

Apply pressure to the feet, using the THIGH muscles, so you are sitting "lightly"

ELBOWS BENT, now DROP the hands to the bars."



Thats copied from the link on the Ride Well Revival thread on www.bmwsporttouring.com in the Ride Well forum.

I learned more about riding from reading Master Yoda's (Dick Frantz's) words during the early days of bmwrt.com than any other source other than my first basic msf class and actually being riding on the road.

Here's a sample of the little treasures he used to concoct to help others with their riding

"When doing Sport Touring, ...what were after -- trying to get across Unknown Roads, with style, grace, and alacrity, eschewing Outright Speed in favor of Wellbeing accompanied by satifying Pace." :D Thanks Dick !

Firstpeke
06-06-2009, 04:46 PM
Sit in whatever way allows you to be comfortable for long periods whilst still being able to reach all the controls and use them to good effect.

If your back hurts like billy o' when you get off the bike, then you need to try adjusting your position to alleviate this.

I have a lowered seat on my ST1100 and although it feels slightly odd when on the bike as my legs are bent more than usual, it actually makes the ride quite comfortable, my seat, however, could do with a little more padding as my erm..... heavy musculature(!) is just slightly too much for the thin padding which remains.....