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Mick
11-20-2009, 02:50 PM
Had rotator cuff surgery 1 1/2 weeks ago. Full thickness tear (NOT due to accident). If anyone has had this surgery, how long was it before you were able to ride and how long was it before you were able do long distance, multi day rides with no problem?

BTW, I have helibars on my 2001 ST1100 if that's important.

Blue One
11-20-2009, 03:17 PM
I had my right shoulder done, very similar to what you have had done. Very painful surgery.

I suppose your arm is still imobilized in a sling. I was off work for 3 months and did not (could not) ride during that time.

It was 5 months before I could ride with the docs permission. (I rode after 4 1/2 months ;) )

I too had a 99 ST1100 with heli bars at the time and I found it was very hard to ride.

The main problem was the pulling on the shoulder when you accelerate and need to hold on. You don't realize just how much strain that puts on your shoulder until you have one weakened from injury and repair via surgery.

Another issue was weight bearing during slowing down as you tend then to hold your weight back with your arms.

The two things combined can be difficult to manage.

Give yourself time to heal and ask your doctors advice.

I set off on a long trip earlier than I should have and while I didn't do further damage I used lots of Ibuprofen. You will also find your arm gets tired quickly.

If you re-injure the shoulder chances of fixing it again are almost nil.

Larry.

ron47
11-20-2009, 05:20 PM
Yep, left shoulder for me and three months is about when you feel like you are almost back. I think at 6-months (today) I am about 90%. The Heli-bars on the ST made it very difficult to roll it around the garage. Stock bars are easier on the shoulder but you can pretty much count on sitting out for at least two months, probably three. I have a KLR and a ZRX and the KLR was the easiest one to ride I guess due to the light weight and wide bars. Good luck....do the therapy and all the little daily things they show you. Believe it or not, there was a reason for all those sissy exercises. :)

veefore
11-20-2009, 05:29 PM
Had a torn labrum in my right shoulder from a dislocation as well as a very loose "capsule". 5 weeks in the sling and 3 1/2 months in physical therapy. I rode at the 3 1/2 month mark, it was tolerable but certainly not 100% at that point. I live in the Northeast so I planned it around my winter "down time". Best of luck - listen to the physical therapist, they are your greatest allies!

hojo in sc
11-20-2009, 06:17 PM
I hate to tell you when I started riding the moto, I was the exception to the rule for a couple of reasons, I insisted on having Platelet Gel injected into the shoulder. The surgeon was so amazed with my recovery, lack of pain post op (can you say NO pain meds, other than a few Ibuprofens here and there), and my rapid return of range of motion. I was actually driving the moto to rehab in no time.

Big Red
11-20-2009, 06:27 PM
Is this platelet gel injection a new medical technology for rotator cuff tears?

Nomad05
11-20-2009, 06:44 PM
Left shoulder for me, along with full bicep tear. In the sling for just over a month. Physical theraphy for 8 weeks. Back on the bike in 3 months...but not 90% until ~6 months. Three years later, doing fine but on long rides it still gets sore.

Key to near full recovery is doing exercises between PT sessions. Don't baby it or it will take longer for the range of motion to "unfreeze".

Good luck!

Herb
'03 ST1300
'99 VFR

Spotthegerbil
11-20-2009, 07:45 PM
I can't give you a timescale for that particular op, but it's true, you don't realise how much you use your shoulder until it's damaged. I was 3 months post clavicle operation before I could look at a bike, and even then it was a small sports bike.

While your arm is in the sling, do as much exercise as your surgeon allows, even if it's only squeezing something with your hand. Once you are free to use the rest of your arm, make sure you follow your physio.

And don't even look at the bike, don't even sit on it and try moving the bars until the surgeon says so. Mrs Gerbil hurt herself a long time after her op by just sitting on the bike in the driveway. And if you can, don't put the bike on the centre stand for a while, that helps as well - that's a very big strain, and an odd set of movements that you are best to avoid.

schlep1967
11-20-2009, 07:56 PM
Can't give you a time frame as I was not riding when I had my shoulder done. My best advice to you is work on range of motion as soon as the Doc allows. I was told by my very old doctor, "You can get your strength back anytime but if you do not get your range of motion back right away, you never will." I touched zero weights for the first 30 days of therapy. I have full range of motion and my shoulder is 95% of what it ever was. My only limiting factor is throwing a ball from an off balance position, I can do it but it sure does hurt for a minute afterwards.

hojo in sc
11-20-2009, 07:58 PM
Is this platelet gel injection a new medical technology for rotator cuff tears?

It is gaining in popularity, we've been using with the surgeons here for over 6 years and now the surgeon that did my shoulder, uses it on ALL OF HIS SHOULDERS and ACL repairs. He had been using it (as do 99% of the surgeons at the hospital I work at) use it on all of their Total Knee and Total Hip Replacement cases, but hadn't on his 'out patient' cases until he saw my recovery.

Total knee replacement for example, studies have shown (even at our hospital) go home a day sooner (hospital saves money), require less pain meds (hospital saves money), require less donor blood (hospital saves money), reduce the risk of infection (you guessed it, saves the hospital money), and the patient's have a greater range of motion sooner, than those not getting Platelet Gel.

Platelets are rich in growth factors, so besides just in helping with bleeding, they also help reduce the risk of infection, reduce pain, reduce the need for donor blood, reduce the time in the hospital, increase bone growth....

My younger son had a rare type of hip fracture (alvusion fracture) where he took off running so fast, his muscle tore off a big chunk of his hip bone. The surgeon put two screws in to put the bone in place, and injected Platelet Gel (per my request). The surgeon was amazed at how much faster the bone healed (I wasn't, I knew it would). Because of this, my son was cleared to get back in the game much sooner (baseball).

Oh, I don't think I mentioned that to get the Platelet Gel, depending on the type of surgery, about 44-88 ml's of your OWN blood is drawn off, spun down, and the platelets are recovered and sprayed back in to the surgical wound.

Carl Custer
11-21-2009, 06:24 AM
platelet gel injection . . . It is gaining in popularity

[Carl]: Dang. Too late for me. Had right shoulder done about 9 years ago. Left shoulder done 9 weeks ago.
Riding in 7 weeks. :)

Physical therapy is important as is your general health.
I've worked on my core muscles so that my arms can just rest on the grips.

For those fortunate enough to not have torn your rotator cuffs consider weight training WITH AN INSTRUCTOR or therapist. ;)
If you just start working your pecs and biceps, you can aggravate your rotator cuffs. A trained instructor will have you also strengthen the other shoulder supporting muscles. :cool:

It'll make a big difference in your riding endurance and should you end up with a torn rotator cuff, you'll recover sooner with fewer pain meds. :p:

hojo in sc
11-21-2009, 01:42 PM
platelet gel injection . . . It is gaining in popularity

[Carl]: Dang. Too late for me. Had right shoulder done about 9 years ago. Left shoulder done 9 weeks ago.
Riding in 7 weeks. :)

Physical therapy is important as is your general health.
I've worked on my core muscles so that my arms can just rest on the grips.

For those fortunate enough to not have torn your rotator cuffs consider weight training WITH AN INSTRUCTOR or therapist. ;)
If you just start working your pecs and biceps, you can aggravate your rotator cuffs. A trained instructor will have you also strengthen the other shoulder supporting muscles. :cool:

It'll make a big difference in your riding endurance and should you end up with a torn rotator cuff, you'll recover sooner with fewer pain meds. :p:

+1 and you should continue to work out those muscles (don't need to look like Arnie), but it is good to keep working with the range of motion all the time.

Phillyrube
11-21-2009, 02:12 PM
I had the surgery 2 years after a car accident. Doc went in with a 'scope, saw too much damage so he had to open my shoulder. Surgery and pain killers were great. Doc was good, told me to do ABSOLUTELY WHAT THE PT GUY TELLS YOU, and you'll heal fine. If they tell you to lift one ounce weights, lift one ounce weights. Don't jump to 5.
I was out of work 4 months, and celebrated by buying my ST1300, and rode it home still on light duty. Was doing regular rides within 6 months, and have had no problems since.:D

Mick
11-21-2009, 04:46 PM
Guys, thanks a bunch for the feed back. It's a big help!



Blue One sez: I suppose your arm is still imobilized in a sling. I was off work for 3 months and did not (could not) ride during that time.

I managed to go back to work after 5 days (desk job) but had to go back home for 1/2 day because of pain. Went back to work the following day and all was fine from that point on. I was getting SO bored at home. I think I'll stay out a little longer the next time when the right shoulder gets it's turn.


ron47 sez: I think at 6-months (today) I am about 90%.

This was supposed to be a "clean up" operation that would have only taken a short time to recover from but when the doc got in he found a bunch of damage that had to be repaired. Now I'm looking at months of recovery.


veefore sez: I live in the Northeast so I planned it around my winter "down time".

Yeah, I did the same even though our winters are mild compared to yours.


hojo in sc sez: Platelet Gel injected into the shoulder. The surgeon was so amazed with my recovery, lack of pain post op (can you say NO pain meds, other than a few Ibuprofens here and there), and my rapid return of range of motion. I was actually driving the moto to rehab in no time.

Wow, that's amazing. Never heard of the stuff. When I woke up in the recovery room I was hooked up to some sort of anesthetic "block". I was in virtually no pain until 6 or 8 hours after they unhooked it. The Vicodin took care of that however. I did Vicodin, primarily for sleeping for 3 days then went to ibuprofen.


Nomad05 sez: Key to near full recovery is doing exercises between PT sessions. Don't baby it or it will take longer for the range of motion to "unfreeze".

Started doing exercises yesterday. All I gotta say is YEOW!


Sportthegerbil sez: And don't even look at the bike, don't even sit on it and try moving the bars until the surgeon says so.

Good advice. It's tough going out into the garage only to have my bikes stare at me with those wide, mournful headlights! :p:


Schlep1967 sez: "You can get your strength back anytime but if you do not get your range of motion back right away, you never will."

That's a sobering thought.


Phillyrube sez: If they tell you to lift one ounce weights, lift one ounce weights. Don't jump to 5.

Yeah, this is an easy trap to fall into. I've been in physical therapy for several years for my shoulders (hoping that would cure the problem) and a couple of times I jumped in resistance bands a bit too quickly and my shoulder rebelled!

pyropat
11-21-2009, 08:31 PM
Hey Mick I had my Left Rotator Cuff Surgery April 1st, I didn't ride till July ,everything was fine just the range of motion. I am going back to work in Dec. that will make it 8 months off work.
Don't even try to lift your arm by itself till your therapist or your Doctor says it's time, you don't want to have surgery again more time in the sling, not to mention you will loose some of your range when they have to cut you again !
Like Nomad05 said DO YOUR PHYSICAL THERAPY !
Do your exercises at home you will get your range back a lot quicker, but don't push to hard.
I feel 100% better and have all my range of motion back.
Good Luck and your Bike will be there when your better don't rush it.
Don't forget to plug in that battery Tender !

bamamike
11-21-2009, 09:14 PM
right done 2 years ago. rode back and forth to work 2 months after the surgery. (only 20 miles each way). It was a few more months before i was decent and 1.5 years before i was as good as before surgery.(i lift weights) but happy to say i have exceeded all my lifts and my shoulder feels better than the other one. Do your P.T. and don't skip. You will heal and feel great. Michael

Mick
05-11-2010, 09:02 PM
Is there a doctor in the house? I have a question concerning motorcycle riding and itís effect on shoulder healthÖ read on.

Today marked my 6th month since rotator cuff repair surgery and I just had a checkup today with the surgeon. The doc said that the shoulder was healed and that I could return to doing normal activities (I will however continue therapy for a while to keep stretching and loosening things back up). When he told me this I immediately said, does this mean Iím OK enough to ride motorcycles? The reaction on his face was immediate. He went on a tear about how he didnít like motorcycles and mumbled something about how Iíd be right back in his office with the same problems I had before the surgery, especially if I "fall off". I questioned him as to whether there was something inherent in riding a motorcycle that caused rotator cuff problems. He sputtered and mumbled for a few seconds. Then as if grabbing something out of the air he said "the vibration".

I knew from speaking with the physical therapists that he was against motorcycles so I wasnít too surprised but I was a bit surprised at the strength of his reaction. Itís also because of the strength of his reaction and his seeming grasping for words that Iím a bit skeptical about what he said.

If youíre a doc reading this, is there really something about riding motorcycles that is bad enough on the shoulders that it could cause rotator cuff problems?

If youíve had this surgery, what did your doc say when you popped the question to him, "Can I return to riding motorcycles again"?

I look forward to your replies as this is really bothering me. I canít say it never occurred to me that my riding over the last 11 years may have had something to do with my shoulder problems. I did after all make the decision to finally have the operation while returning from a 6000 mile, two week trip last summer. It was on that trip that both my shoulders bothered me for the first time while riding.

My shoulders had been bothering me for several years but when it started affecting my riding, I figured it was time to go under the knife. Now Iím unsure what to do after what the doc said. Riding is my only real passion in life but I absolutely do not want to have to go back through another one of these operations needlessly. The recovery from rotator cuff repair surgery is LONG, painful and eats up every single spare minute of you life. It is not fun.

nisbeam
05-12-2010, 08:47 AM
No nothing about riding your bike endangers your rotator cuff - unless you have an accident/ bad fall etc. However hard-core off roading may be different, but normal riding - don't worry.

I tore my rotator cuff in a fight (Krav-Maga) and it took almost 6 months to recover (they don't do surgery here in the UK unless it is a disabling problem). But following recovery some regular exercises really help regain strength because it will not come back by itself.

Here is a link to some exercises, and also some other useful links there about rotator cuffs in general.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/criticalbench24.htm

Take it easy, always get advice if you're not sure and you will recover

:03biker: Good luck Andy.

hojo in sc
05-12-2010, 02:07 PM
Find another doc (I work with a bunch by the way). I road my motorcycle to rehab after my surgery, and your just getting ready to ride at 6 months :confused: WOW, I was riding within 2 weeks, just didn't put the bike up on the centerstand without my wife there to help.

Mick
05-12-2010, 02:50 PM
I road my motorcycle to rehab after my surgery, and your just getting ready to ride at 6 months :confused: WOW, I was riding within 2 weeks, .

My RC surgery was pretty major. Had a full thickness tear. It was thought going in that it would just be a simple debridment because the MRI showed nothing bad going on. The rotator cuff is apparently a hard part of the body to image as I've had PT's tell me that tears don't always show up on MRI. At any rate, going into the surgery the doc thought I'd be back to normal in a couple of months. Instead what he found was a torn tendon and as a result I'm looking at a full year to be back to normal.

I'm healed up enough to go back to doing "normal activities" but I've still got plenty of pain & stifness to work out via physical therapy. I also still can't sleep in bed yet due to pain that comes on when I lie down. Sleeping in a recliner is getting REAL old.

pyropat
05-12-2010, 05:41 PM
2 WEEKS ! I was in a sling for 7 weeks !
Riding won't be a problem I started riding 3 months after my surgery and yes I did ride to therapy too.
I was back to work driving a eighteen wheeler, lifting, reaching and riding wheelies and after a year I feel better then before the injury.
My doctor said if I was going to be riding dirt bikes to take it easy.
Do your Therapy ! Therapy is your friend !

Mick
05-12-2010, 06:13 PM
2 WEEKS ! I was in a sling for 7 weeks !

This is one contest I wish I didn't win but my immobilizer sling was on for 8 weeks. I suspect it's the reason my external rotation has not completely returned to normal. It's almost there but man is it a struggle to get those last few degrees of motion back.

hojo in sc
05-13-2010, 01:11 PM
Are you guys seeing sports medicine orthopods? I was doing my range of motion rehab almost immediately. They also know that the Platelet Gel made a huge difference. So much so, that the surgeon uses it on ALL of his shoulder surgeries after seeing how well I did, whereas before it was only on Total Knee and Total Hip Replacement.

I took no pain meds and had great range of motion very early on, even the Physical Therapist was amazed. At 2 weeks I was catching for my son and at 8 weeks I was throwing the baseball back to him. Up until then I was just catching for him...he is in college and is a pitcher, so there I am catching, then flipping the ball to my wife to throw it back to him).

Mick
05-13-2010, 07:35 PM
Are you guys seeing sports medicine orthopods? I was doing my range of motion rehab almost immediately.


Don't know exactly what your surgery was but torn rotator cuff tendons don't heal very quickly after surgery because they don't get much blood (so my PT's tell me). I was warned repeatedly by my doctor about lifting or doing anything that could undo the surgery.

Seems like it was several weeks after the operation before I started doing simple pendulum exercises for range of motion. I believe I was still in the sling but was able to take it off for the exercise. Wish I had kept a log of everything that happened as I'll probably be having the same thing done to the other shoulder within a year.

QuantumMechanic
05-13-2010, 09:51 PM
Well, I can't claim to be a member of your club since my sholder surgery was to replace the entire joint, not to repair the cuff; new ball, new socket. I was in Friday morning at 7 and was in physical therapy the following Monday with restrictions on which WAY I could exercise. They gave me big rubber bands and a pulley thingy to force lift the arm. Oh the pain but doing what they said put me back on the bike in 3 weeks and I rode from Houston to Eureka Springs AR on the 5th or 6th weekend out with very little discomfort.

It was motorcycling what put me in the condition I was in. Without going into a lot of detail: in 1980 I hit a ditch doing 60 mph on a bike that failed had beneath me (a rebuild by someone else). I can remember the ER MD telling me that God must have someting else for me to do since it was a miracle I was there and not in the morgue (there were other injuries but the shoulder was the worst of it). The ball sheared off and the arm bone was sticking out the top of the shoulder. They put the shoulder back together with the best technology of the time: wire, rods, long pins, and screws. The fix lasted 25 years! The shoulder was replaced in Sept of 2009; it had been becoming more and more of a problem - I mean pain on every movement and impossible to find a postion to sleep in.

Well, let me tell you if you are ever faced with having shoulder replacement surgery done do not be afraid of it. I was and the fears were groundless. Heck, I'm able scratch places with my right hand I have not been able to reach in 25 years. I can get things off the top shelf again with the right arm. Pain is gone. There is no pain now even to put the ST on its centerstand!! I should have done the procedure 10 years ago but the technology to do what was done NOW did not exist THEN. In some ways it was better to have waited.

Best thing I've done for myself in a while. I do not know if it is appropriate to give this pitch but the place was the Fondren Orthopedic Hospital in Houston and the doctor's name was Edwards. It is a first-class place.

Ride ON!

-Al-

Mick
05-14-2010, 03:37 AM
Well, I can't claim to be a member of your club since my sholder surgery was to replace the entire joint, not to repair the cuff; new ball, new socket. I was in Friday morning at 7 and was in physical therapy the following Monday <SNIP> I should have done the procedure 10 years ago but the technology to do what was done NOW did not exist THEN. In some ways it was better to have waited.



Wow! Good to know. Makes you glad to be alive during this day and age.

hojo in sc
05-14-2010, 07:30 AM
Don't know exactly what your surgery was but torn rotator cuff tendons don't heal very quickly after surgery because they don't get much blood (so my PT's tell me). I was warned repeatedly by my doctor about lifting or doing anything that could undo the surgery.

Seems like it was several weeks after the operation before I started doing simple pendulum exercises for range of motion. I believe I was still in the sling but was able to take it off for the exercise. Wish I had kept a log of everything that happened as I'll probably be having the same thing done to the other shoulder within a year.

A lot of the patients that orthopods see are elderly and hence, they aren't too concerned about getting them 'back in the game'. Many years ago I had one orthopod look at my hip and tell me to give up bicycling, I was till racing and was not about to give it up. Then you go to a physician that deals specifially with sports injuries and knows how to (better) get the patient back in the game.

I'm not saying that everyone is going to have the same results, nor will I say that everyone should push themselves as much as I did. My first point was to help educate people on the benefits of Platelet Gel, and even then, you have to be careful; some sales reps try to get the docs to use other versions of Platelet Gel that does not have the same results as what we offer to our docs (and to their patients). I am not a 'sales rep', but a clinical healthcare provider that evaluates all the machines to see which works best before offering it to the docs.

QuantumMechanic
05-17-2010, 08:39 PM
I was in Friday morning at 7 and was in physical therapy the following Monday with restrictions on which WAY I could exercise.

I came back again and re-read this post and the above statement is not true. I checked the records. I was in on Friday at 7 all right and I was in therapy on Monday morning but there was a whole week in between where I did nothing but lay around in a drugged stupor. So I am not the superman I made myself out to be. My bad. Its all true, just + 1 week.

-AL-

pyropat
05-18-2010, 04:11 PM
I was told by my doctor that my that my tissue would tear before the Carbon Fiber Suture would.
I think if you had any therapy after just 1 or 2 weeks you didn't have major Rotator Cuff surgery.
But that's just my opinion !

hojo in sc
05-18-2010, 06:53 PM
I was told by my doctor that my that my tissue would tear before the Carbon Fiber Suture would.
I think if you had any therapy after just 1 or 2 weeks you didn't have major Rotator Cuff surgery.
But that's just my opinion !

Let me tell ya, there is a WIDE range of surgical rehab between orthopods. My orthopod (whom I know on a more professional level due to my nature of work in the operating room) has always had me (and his other patients) getting into rehab ASAP to prevent the tissues from getting too rigid. The rehab isn't aggressive starting off, it is mainly for range of motion so that the arm (or leg for ACL repairs) doesn't get too stiff. I've seen people that didn't have rehab soon enough and their arms were so darn stiff it was horrible.

kempco
05-18-2010, 10:46 PM
I had RC surgery Jan 09. Complete tear and seperation. Wore a sling for 2 weeks, started therapy at two weeks. Rode street bike to doctor visit at about two months. Released back to work with no restrictions at 6 mths. Rode dirt bike at 6 mths. Doc said it would be about 1 yr before I had no issues. He was right on, I have full range of motion but I don't have full strength quite back yet maybe 90-95%. Overall very happy. :04biker:

yogione
05-19-2010, 08:33 PM
Thanks for all the great information. I am looking at RC surgery at some point this year. I have a lot of confidence in my doc who has estimated recovery at 4 - 6 mos. I am hoping to get through the riding season before repairing the shoulder, but I'll go when the shoulder says go. My feeling is I want to be riding pain free for many years to come so if short term sacrifice is called for, so be it. But man, I love my bike and this really bites.
:slv13:

Mick
06-05-2010, 04:42 PM
Did my first ride in eight months today (7 months since rotator cuff surgery). MAN it felt good to be on a bike again!! :biker: :) . I had almost forgotten what a soul cleansing experience it can be.

My trip today was only about a 40 mile round trip. Had to get a new inspection sticker. It was not without surprises however as my shoulder experienced a bit of discomfort after about 10 miles and in a spot that I haven't felt pain in since the surgery. I'm hoping this is something that will calm down because if not, my days of 5 or 6 hour Sunday AM rides may be over.

I'm still sleeping in a recliner but I'm getting near being able to sleep in bed. I actually tried last night and was able to sleep for about 2 hours before the aching woke me up. Just a couple of months ago I couldn't have laid down more than 10 minutes and the pain would have begun. The progress continues.:)

Mick
06-24-2010, 06:22 AM
Does anyone have personal experience with a shoulder surgeon in Houston that they could recommend? If I decide to have the other shoulder done, I want to change docs.

yogione
06-28-2010, 05:50 PM
I don't know any docs in Houston but I do not think feeling discomfort is abnormal. Everyone I know who has had this surgery says it's really at least a year before feeling fully recovered. I have a very physical job and the people I know at work who have had RC surgery have all returned to work quite successfully. Some do have a bit of pain that never seems to go away while others have been pain free in the shoulder. I will be having mine somewhere between the end of Aug and early Oct. I hope to be riding next spring with or without discomfort. :please1:

Mick
10-03-2010, 11:04 AM
Thought I would update this thread.

This post will be about checking out a surgeon thoroughly before letting him touch you! Doctors are like auto mechanics. Some are good, some are so-so, and others shouldn't be in practice. Guess where this is headed :mad:?

My last post was some time in early June of this year. Following my rotator cuff repair surgery in November of last year, I went to a therapy clinic three times a week until June 3rd . Between visits to the clinic and my home therapy, I spent about 2 1/2 to 3 hours per day (EVERY day) with shoulder exercises. :weights2: I remember the date of June 3rd vividly because I had set that following Saturday to be the date I'd take my VFR out after not having ridden anything for eight months. As noted in one of my posts in this thread, I took the viffer out and felt alive again. Then, in late June, my riding career was cut short once again when the rotator cuff repair came apart while doing my home therapy exercises.

Intuition... how many of us have had those little "voices" in our head that seem to tell us via feelings that maybe we should do something differently before we do them? Those guiding feelings manifested themselves at the moment that I decided to have the surgery while making my way back from California on the ST last August. The instant the decision was made, the thought of having the doctor I was with do the surgery gave me a second of pause. I had been with him for several years but must admit I never really liked him. He always seemed to be in a hurry, was a poor listener and would never give a direct answer to a question. I let him do the surgery because he had done my wife's carpal tunnel surgery and did a great job. I told myself that I was just being silly, that what was important was whether or not he was a good surgeon, not whether I liked him. I should have listened to myself. He was not a good surgeon.

Now back to late June. Despite the increasingly intense discomfort of the failed repair, I delayed for several weeks doing anything about it while I searched for the best ortho doc I could find in Houston (I was NOT going to go back to the original doc). The internet is a wonderful thing! While researching via the web, I happened upon a guy who was raved about and who was part of a team of doctors who regularly work on members of the city's basketball team. I made an appointment with him hoping that a re-repair was possible. I was told that I had a 70% to 80% chance of a successful second repair. Good enough for me, "Let's do it!" I told the new doc. Then the pre-surgical tests began.

"The original repair was doomed to fail" the new doc told me as he viewed the MRI pics. That statement validated every suspicion I'd had about the competence of the original surgeon. I'd had a difficult recovery, never did get all my range of motion back and almost a year later, I still can not sleep in a bed (have to sleep in a recliner). The minute he made this statement, in my mind's eye I was back on my ST droning east on I-10 at night through Arizona in the rain and having that intuition that maybe I should not have the surgery done by a doc that I didn't have good feelings about. As stated previously, I should have listened to myself.

I had the re-repair done August 2nd :hurt1:. Not only did the new doc have to repair for a second time the torn rotator cuff tendon, he also had to reattach a bicep tendon that had pulled away and remove a lot of bone spurs that had been missed during the first surgery. I am currently going back through physical therapy to regain range of motion and strengthen atrophied muscles. The difference is startling compared to my first round of surgery. Way less intense pain and have a lot more range of motion sooner than the last time which should mean less time in physical therapy. What a difference a competent surgeon makes!

Riding... About the time of my second surgery, I decided that it probably wasn't wise for me to ride again since I figured that I might not get a chance for a third repair if it failed again. All it would take I told myself would be a grab at the bars during a tipover to keep the bike from dropping and out the shoulder tendon would go again. As a result, I sold the viffer and for the first time in over a decade, there was no motorcycle in my garage. Now, two months after the last surgery I'm having a change of heart. Riding has been such a huge part of my life that I just can't seem to let it go. I've made up my mind to ask the doc about it and see what he thinks. If he says wait "X" more months or years and my shoulder will be plenty strong, then I'm going to be on two wheels again! I've already been looking at ST replacements. The Bandit ABS and Sprint GT are current top contenders :04biker:.

I wrote all of the above not to lay bare all that I've been through but to drive home to everybody the consequences of not spending the time to check out the person who will be cutting on you. It doesn't matter if we're talking about shoulders or hearts or brains, the principle is the same. It's your responsibility to check the surgeon out as much as you can BEFORE he touches you. If I had checked out my first surgeon on the web, I'd have read several horror stories from some very angry ex patients. They were there for the reading if I'd only done the research. Like Ronald Reagan once said, trust but verify!

Mark
10-03-2010, 03:07 PM
Mick I'm really glad you've found a good surgeon for your 'clean-up' operation.

I think finding a dr. that does athlete repairs is the key to 'repair' surgery... Chris's 2nd doc does them and her 2nd knee is doing *really* well after 9 years (the 1st lasted 11; but, was giving her trouble by 9 years after surgery).

I'm sorry you sold your bikes; but really happy to know you think another bike is in your future!

Mark

longdog_cymru
10-03-2010, 03:15 PM
I had an accident back in March where I suffered a acromioclavicular displacement. All 3 ligaments were ruptured and although I was riding my bike in 3 months, I suffered other effects of the injury.

The result is the surgeon has suggested I have surgery to stabilise my shoulder. He said that he would cut off the "floating" end, i.e. the shoulder end, of the clavicle and take another ligament from mt shoulder and attach it to the clavicle.

Has anyone experienced this surgery and if so, was it successful? Where there side affects?

:bk13:

Mick
10-03-2010, 04:49 PM
the surgeon has suggested I have surgery to stabilise my shoulder. He said that he would cut off the "floating" end, i.e. the shoulder end, of the clavicle and take another ligament from mt shoulder and attach it to the clavicle.


Wow! That does not sound like a fun thing to do! :(

Mick
10-03-2010, 04:54 PM
really happy to know you think another bike is in your future!


It all depends on what the doc says but I'm going to keep researching a new bike on the assumption that he will say it's OK after a certain period of time. If he says no way, then I'll just have to suck it up and move on, hopefully finding something else to do that will give me as much relaxation and enjoyment.

yogione
10-10-2010, 05:12 PM
I am so sorry to hear about your experience of needing a second surgery. I know one guy at work who had to have his redone. Three others used my doc on my recommendation and all returned to heavy physical work successfully. I have no illusions about a miracle recovery, but I have every intention of working hard at getting it right.

Put the bike away on the 4th, had my surgery done on the 5th. The doc is everything. This was my second surgery with this doc and he is one great surgeon. 4 hr repair of the rc and a torn labrum as well as doing a clavicle resection to ease the arthritis and open tendon space. Had a scalene muscle block which knocked out all pain for the first 15 hours. Have a continual motion machine and cooling blanket and off all pain meds today. Have been sleeping in bed, poorly, but doable. Last night was almost OK.

After serious negotiating with the ST it was agreed to give up fall riding which is spectacular in Wisconsin and be ready for spring. I am hopeful the arm cooperates and keeps both me and the bike happy.

I believe you can and will ride again. The body is pretty amazing and resilient and with a good recovery program and patience almost anything is possible. I of course wrote this last bit for myself since patience does not come easy for me.
Vic

:slv13:

vinny
10-10-2010, 06:53 PM
I had a r/c repair and bicep reattachment on July 2nd of this year. The doc was a sports surgeon and I had used him before. He was amazed at my rate of recovery, both range of movement and strength. I've been told by other docs that I healed fast. Bottom line, I was back on the bike in about 7 weeks, but not for long rides. I will finally be returning to my very physical job tomorrow! I feel that every one has their own rate of healing, but should rely on what the docs and the physical therapist tell them...

Mick
10-10-2010, 08:48 PM
I am so sorry to hear about your experience of needing a second surgery.<SNIP> The doc is everything.


Thanks for the kind thoughts yogione. As to the doc, truer words were never spoken. If my current doc had done my original surgery, I would not have had to go back through this and would have already been healed up by now and on my way across the country on my ST!


This was my second surgery with this doc and he is one great surgeon. 4 hr repair of the rc and a torn labrum as well as doing a clavicle resection to ease the arthritis and open tendon space. Had a scalene muscle block which knocked out all pain for the first 15 hours. Have a continual motion machine and cooling blanket and off all pain meds today. Have been sleeping in bed, poorly, but doable. Last night was almost OK.


Sounds like you had the full surgical monty! I was only on the machine for a week but I do believe it is why I have so much of my range of motion back so quickly. I've still got a good ways to go but I'm light years ahead of where I was at this same time after my last surgery.

For me, the after surgery pain was nowhere near as bad this time around despite the fact that this second surgery was more way involved. In addition to repairing the full thickness tear of the R/C tendon, he removed bone spurs, manipulated the arm to fix a partially frozen shoulder, reattached the bicep that had pulled away and a couple of other things that I haven't a clue as to what they were. All the first guy did was "repair" the rotator cuff and I still can't sleep lying down after 11 months. There was WAY more pain for a lot longer with that first surgery too. I don't think I got a decent nights sleep for the first two months from continually waking up in the middle of the night in pain... and that was while sleeping in a recliner, not lying down in a bed!



The body is pretty amazing and resilient and with a good recovery program and patience almost anything is possible. I of course wrote this last bit for myself since patience does not come easy for me.
Vic


Trust me, I know what you mean.



Bottom line, I was back on the bike in about 7 weeks, but not for long rides.


Glad to hear it Vinny. Given the mangling my shoulder has taken in the course of two surgeries, I'm not going to even attempt a ride until next spring at the earliest. Gives me plenty of time to figure out what my next ride is going to be :biker: since I sold both the ST and the VFR in the midst of all this.

yogione
10-11-2010, 09:59 AM
I had a r/c repair and bicep reattachment on July 2nd of this year. The doc was a sports surgeon and I had used him before. He was amazed at my rate of recovery, both range of movement and strength. I've been told by other docs that I healed fast. Bottom line, I was back on the bike in about 7 weeks, but not for long rides. I will finally be returning to my very physical job tomorrow! I feel that every one has their own rate of healing, but should rely on what the docs and the physical therapist tell them...

Vinny,
A great recovery story. I too heal pretty quickly and already have visions of spring. Fortunately winter intervenes here and both the ST and I will rest. I suspect the company will try to call me back in at about 6 - 8 weeks and give me 12 weeks to come up to speed. I'm in no hurry.
Vic

vinny
10-11-2010, 06:57 PM
First day back after a 13 week recovery and all seems well. The day went by like a blurr. Hopefully I can get one more year in before retirement.