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Thread: Another brake pad question....

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    raybonz's Avatar
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    Another brake pad question....

    After returning from a ride recently, I heard what sounded like the front pads on my 04 1300 were dragging. Up to that point I've had no brake issues of any kind. After taking the left
    front pads out, I saw what I can only describe as a kind of glaze on them. I last had that on my 79 Trans Am and cleaned it off with some 1000 grit wet/dry and never had it again. I
    know this pad technology is way different but I was wondering if anyone here has had similar issues and fixed it using this method? The pads have a lot of life still on them so hate to spend the money needlessly to replace them.

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    Moderator Byron's Avatar
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    Re: Another brake pad question....

    Actually if you just do some aggressive stops using the front brakes only they will clean themselves with the help of the holes and heat buildup. Don't let them cool down between about half a dozen slow downs. No need to come to a complete stop just get back up to about 50 and repeat.

  3. #3

    Re: Another brake pad question....

    A more important question would be, what caused the brakes to glaze? Are the guide pins dry/dirty or sticking? Are the pads wearing evenly? more on one side than the other?
    Are the needle bearings at the SMC pivot point dry? Is the lower pivot bolt head dry and hanging up?
    Are they OEM pads or EBC?
    Standing by the white courtesy

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    SMSW's Avatar
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    Re: Another brake pad question....

    Larry has an excellent point. Glad to have you back, Larry.

    Never tried the (pick your ethnicity) tuneup method of deglazing brakes. I too have used sandpaper - and nothing like 1000 grit. Just be sure to clean off the pads well after sanding. I've wondered about grit embedded in the pad causing wear on the disk, but I use a stiff bristle brush to clean the pad(s) after using the sandpaper and inspect carefully.

  5. #5
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    raybonz's Avatar
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    Re: Another brake pad question....

    As always, great info from you all. Thank you. I will certainly go with the low tech method mentioned by you, Bryon. While doing the install though, I'll make sure to check for proper lubrication of the guide pins and all points of metal to metal contact Larry. And by the way, thanks again for all the help with the R&R of my water pump earlier this year Larry. Works like a champ! The way I would do the sandpaper is get adhesive backed paper in 1000 grit, put it on a piece of glass and lightly sand in one direction until it's all cleaned. And yes, the pads are wearing evenly, they just don't look good.

  6. #6
    John Heath jfheath's Avatar
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    Re: Another brake pad question....

    As well as what everyone else has said, the pads respond well to a good clean up, partly because of the road debris that can build up, partly because of the oily road deposits that can end up on there and partly because the disk pads can become glazed.

    On the road, the front brakes respond particularly well from a good ride in heavy rain when the road surface is puddled - with plenty of hard braking. You choose the road carefully of course. Also worth noting is that after a wet ride, the disc rotor surface can become rusty very quickly (overnight) and the pads and discs look terrible until they have been used for a first time. You can always tell when this has happened - the first application of the brakes will have you over the handlebars !

    I take the pads off, clean all of the grot from between the blocks of friction material, clean the backing plate, squeal plate (and insulation pad on the rear pads). I usually sand the surface as you described with the sandpaper flat and moving lengthways back and forth. It doesn't take much. Brake grease the squeal plate and backing plate - thin smear.

    Here in the UK we get a lot of build up from road muck, farm traffic, and winter coatings of salt and sand. The holes in the disc rotors can also become clogged if you ride regularly in the wet in winter. (Or is this just the UK ?) Byron's aggressive stops will work Ok, but if the issue is road grime or a build up of crud between the friction pads, then a decent clean up is in order.

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